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Listen To The Bible! | Psalm 148 | King James Audio Bible KJV | Praise For God’s Care For Jerusalem | Prayer With Jesus And King David | True Faith In God | Pray The Psalms

Psalm 147 KJV Audio | King James Audio Bible | King James Version | Word Aloud | Oliver Peers

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Psalm 148 | King James Audio Bible KJV | King James Version

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Psalm 148 calls to praise extending from the highest heavens to depths of the earth. This psalm is of the final doxology of the Book of Psalms, which includes Psalms 146 to 150, each beginning and ending with the Hebrew phrase ‘Hallelujah’, translated as ‘Praise ye the LORD’. Structure and content of Psalm 148 delineate a comprehensive cosmology of worship, where every element of creation is summoned to honour God.

The psalm opens with an invocation to praise that spans celestial realms: ‘Praise ye the LORD from the heavens: praise him in the heights.’ This directive is not just to the celestial beings but extends to all of the heavens, including the sun, moon, and stars, which are personified as capable of praising God: ‘Praise ye him, sun and moon: praise him, all ye stars of light.’ This call to worship underscores a theology where the entire universe, in all its order and beauty, reflects the glory of God and participates in a cosmic liturgy.

Following the celestial call, the psalmist turns attention to the terrestrial realm: ‘Praise the LORD from the earth, ye dragons, and all deeps.’ This mention of dragons—often symbolic of chaos in ancient Near Eastern literature—alongside the ‘deeps’, or ocean depths, suggests that even the most mysterious and untamed elements of the natural world are subject to God’s sovereignty and join in the chorus of praise.

Elements of weather—fire, hail, snow, and stormy wind—are also summoned to fulfil God’s command through their praise: ‘Fire, and hail; snow, and vapour; stormy wind fulfilling his word.’ This personification of natural phenomena as agents of God’s will further expands the psalm’s vision of universal praise.

The psalmist extends the call to the earth’s varied landscapes and their inhabitants, from ‘Mountains, and all hills’ to ‘Beasts, and all cattle; creeping things, and flying fowl’. Inclusion of both domesticated animals and wild creatures, alongside the flora of the earth, emphasizes comprehensive scope of God’s lordship over creation and the breadth of the earth’s participation in worship.

Humanity is not exempt from this call to praise. The psalmist invites ‘Kings of the earth, and all people; princes, and all judges of the earth’ to join in this act of worship, making no distinction between rulers and the ruled, the powerful and the powerless. This universal summons cuts across social distinctions, including ‘Both young men, and maidens; old men, and children’, indicating that the capacity and responsibility to praise God transcend age and gender.

Rationale for this universal praise is encapsulated in the declaration: ‘Let them praise the name of the LORD: for his name alone is excellent; his glory is above the earth and heaven.’ The excellence of God’s name—representative of His nature and character—and the transcendence of His glory above all earthly and heavenly realms serve as the foundation for worship. This recognition of God’s supreme worthiness of praise is not merely an acknowledgment of God’s majesty but a testament to God’s acts of creation, sustenance, and redemption.

The psalm concludes with a specific mention of God’s people, Israel, highlighting their unique relationship with God: ‘He also exalteth the horn of his people, the praise of all his saints; even of the children of Israel, a people near unto him.’ This verse underscores the intimate bond between God and Israel, characterized by protection and favour, and positions Israel’s praise as emblematic of a broader call to worship.

Psalm 148, through its invocation of the natural and human worlds in worship, presents a theology of creation where every element, from the cosmic to the quotidian, is imbued with the potential for praise. This panoramic view of praise underscores the psalm’s message: that recognition of God’s sovereignty and goodness is not confined to any single realm but is a reality that permeates the entirety of existence. The psalm expresses interconnectedness of all things under the dominion of God and the universal relevance of praise as the appropriate response to God’s majesty and grace.

Psalm 147 KJV Audio | King James Audio Bible | King James Version | Word Aloud | Oliver Peers

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Psalm 148 | King James Audio Bible KJV | King James Version

Praise ye the LORD. Praise ye the LORD from the heavens: praise him in the heights.

Praise ye him, all his angels: praise ye him, all his hosts.

Praise ye him, sun and moon: praise him, all ye stars of light.

Praise him, ye heavens of heavens, and ye waters that be above the heavens.

Let them praise the name of the LORD: for he commanded, and they were created.

He hath also stablished them for ever and ever: he hath made a decree which shall not pass.

Praise the LORD from the earth, ye dragons, and all deeps:

Fire, and hail; snow, and vapour; stormy wind fulfilling his word:

Mountains, and all hills; fruitful trees, and all cedars:

Beasts, and all cattle; creeping things, and flying fowl:

Kings of the earth, and all people; princes, and all judges of the earth:

Both young men, and maidens; old men, and children:

Let them praise the name of the LORD: for his name alone is excellent; his glory is above the earth and heaven.

He also exalteth the horn of his people, the praise of all his saints; even of the children of Israel, a people near unto him. Praise ye the LORD.

Psalm 147 KJV Audio | King James Audio Bible | King James Version | Word Aloud | Oliver Peers

Jesus Is Lord | Psalms | King James Audio Bible

Psalm 148 | King James Audio Bible KJV | King James Version

  • Universal Call To Praise: The psalm extends an invitation to all of creation, from the heavens to the earth, to praise God.
  • Cosmic Worship: Celestial bodies, the sun, moon, and stars are called to worship, emphasizing the cosmological scope of God’s sovereignty.
  • Natural World’s Adoration: Elements of nature, including weather phenomena and geographical features, are personified as participants in praising God.
  • Inclusivity Of Praise: All forms of life, from the greatest beasts to the smallest creatures, and all levels of human society, from kings to children, are summoned to praise.
  • God’s Sovereignty Over Creation: The psalm acknowledges God’s command in the creation and establishment of the universe, highlighting His omnipotence.
  • Transcendence Of God: God’s glory is recognized as surpassing both heaven and earth, asserting His supreme majesty.
  • Special Relationship With Israel: The psalm concludes by noting God’s special favour towards His people, Israel, underscoring the covenant relationship.
  • Praise As A Testament To God’s Glory: The act of praise by all creation serves as a testament to the excellence of God’s name and the transcendence of His glory.

Psalm 147 KJV Audio | King James Audio Bible | King James Version | Word Aloud | Oliver Peers

Jesus Is Lord | Psalms | King James Audio Bible